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Social Interaction - Secondary
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Microcredential ID : 22
Stack
Impacts of Computing - Secondary
Credits
0.5 PTSB Recertification Credit

Description

This micro-credential represents the knowledge of how to teach the use of computing in a secondary classroom to support new ways of connecting people, communicating information, and expressing ideas. This includes supporting students in learning that computing can connect people, support interpersonal communication, and how the social nature of computing affects institutions and careers in various sectors. Please locate "01. PROFICIENCY SCALE – Impacts of Computing – Social Interaction" under resources to view specific Wyoming Computer Science Content and Performance Standards and the CSTA Standards for Teachers included in this micro-credential.

Standards
  • Computer Science Teachers Assocation (CSTA) Standards for CS Teachers > Equity and Inclusion
    2c - Represent diverse perspectives. Incorporate diverse perspectives and experiences of individuals from marginalized groups in curricular materials and instruction.
  • Computer Science Teachers Assocation (CSTA) Standards for CS Teachers > Professional Growth and Identity
    3d - Commit to the mission of CS for all students. Develop a personal teaching philosophy reflecting that all students can and should learn CS.
  • Computer Science Teachers Assocation (CSTA) Standards for CS Teachers > Instructional Design
    4a - Analyze CS curricula. Analyze CS curricula for implementation in their classrooms in terms of CS standards alignment, accuracy, completeness of content, cultural relevance, and accessibility.
  • Computer Science Teachers Assocation (CSTA) Standards for CS Teachers > Instructional Design
    4b - Develop standards-aligned learning experiences. Design and adapt learning experiences that align to comprehensive K-12 CS standards.
  • Computer Science Teachers Assocation (CSTA) Standards for CS Teachers > Instructional Design
    4g - Inform instruction through assessment. Develop multiple forms and modalities of assessment to provide feedback and support. Use resulting data for instructional decision-making and differentiation.
  • Wyoming Content and Performance Standards > Social Interactions
    8.IC.SI.01 - Using grade appropriate content and complexity, collaborate using tools to connect with peers when creating a computational artifact.
  • Wyoming Content and Performance Standards > Social Interactions
    8.IC.SI.02 - Practice grade-level appropriate behavior and responsibilities while participating in an online community. Identify and report inappropriate behavior.
  • Wyoming Content and Performance Standards > Social Interactions
    L1.IC.SI.01 - Use tools and methods for collaboration.
  • Wyoming Content and Performance Standards > Social Interactions
    L1.IC.SI.02 - Practice grade-level appropriate behavior and responsibilities while participating in an online community. Identify and report inappropriate behavior.
  • Wyoming Content and Performance Standards > Social Interactions
    L2.IC.SI.01 - Practice grade-level appropriate behavior and responsibilities while participating in an online community. Identify and report inappropriate behavior.
How To Earn This Microcredential

To earn this micro-credential you will process through the ADDIE learning model producing evidence that demonstrates your knowledge of the Wyoming Computer Science Content and Performance Standards and the CSTA Standards for Teachers. Through the ADDIE learning model you will analyze standards, design/develop and implement a lesson, collect student work artifacts, and evaluate your professional practices.

Fees
There will be no fee assessed for reviewing this microcredential.
Clarifications

The social interaction micro-credential is one of three micro-credentials that make up the impacts of computing stack. The impacts of computing stack is one of six micro-credential stacks which when completed will lead to a Computer Science Teacher Master Distinction.

Important Terms
Accessibility:

The design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. Accessibility standards that are generally accepted by professional groups include the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) and Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA) standards. [Wikipedia]

Algorithm:

A step-by-step process to complete a task.

Computational artifact:

Anything created by a human using a computational thinking process and a computing device. A computational artifact can be, but is not limited to, a program, image, audio, video, presentation, or web page file.

Computer science:

The study of computing principles, design, and applications (hardware and software); the creation, access, and use of information through algorithms and problem-solving; and the impact of computing on society.

Culture:

A human institution manifested in the learned behavior of people, including their specific belief systems, language(s), social relations, technologies, institutions, organizations, and systems for using and developing resources.

Cultural practices:

The displays and behaviors of a culture.

Equity:

The state, quality, or ideal of being just, impartial, and fair.

Marginalized groups (in computer science):

The people who are commonly denied involvement in computer science, including women and non-binary people, Indigenous and Native peoples, Black people, Latinx, English language learners, students with disabilities, students who are neurodivergent, students from low socioeconomic backgrounds, and students who live in urban and rural areas.

Privilege:

The advantage or immunity, and related influence, that is granted or available only to a particular person or group.

Self efficacy:

An individual’s belief in his or her ability to succeed in specific situations or accomplish a task.

Systemic barriers:

Systemic barriers include the lack of computer science offerings, scheduling conflicts, prerequisite courses, school funding and resources, lack of qualified and experienced teachers, inadequate access to technology, additional course requirements for English learners and students with disabilities, and students being pulled out from computer science classes for additional services.

Unconscious bias:

Prejudice or unsupported judgments in favor of or against one thing, person, or group as compared to another, in a way that is usually considered unfair.

Universal design for learning (UDL):

A framework for designing curriculum to be broadly accessible to all students. (See UDL for Learning Guidelines + Computer Science/Computational Thinking in the resources)

Complete knowledge:

All of the skills listed in the proficient level of the Wyoming Computer Science Content and Performance Standards (see the resources) for the chosen standard.

K–14:

Refers to computer science standards ranging from kindergarten into postsecondary education.

Scope and sequence:

Scope refers to the topics and areas of development within a curriculum, and sequence is the order in which those skills are taught.

Grade band:

The computer science standards are written in grade bands (K–2, 3–5, 6–8, and 9–12). The standard committee (CSSRC) determined the standard to be met by the end of the grade band. In grades 9–12, there are level 1 and level 2 standards. Level 1 standards include introductory skills. Level 2 standards are intended for students who wish to advance their study of computer science.

Chosen grade band:

The teacher or earner can choose which secondary grade band and standard to focus their lesson on.

Supporting computer science standard:

There is a difference between supporting standards and performance standards. All students are expected to be instructed on supporting computer science standards, taught within the context of the performance standards. Supporting standards do not need to be assessed through the district assessment system. If no supporting standards are listed on the "Micro-credential Map by Grade Band" in the resources, this area becomes N/A.

Performance standards:

The Wyoming Content and Performance Standards serve several purposes. They articulate a set of expectations for what students should know and be able to do, enabling them to be prepared for college and career success; to live a life that contributes to the global community. These expectations are communicated to students, parents, educators, and all other Wyoming stakeholders, and provide a common understanding among educators as to what students should learn at particular grades. Standards do not dictate methodology, instructional materials used, or how the material is delivered. (See Wyoming Computer Science Content and Performance Standards in the resources.)

Modalities of assessment:

Modalities of assessment include written assessment, oral assessment, performance tasks, or visual representations.

Forms of assessment:

These include formative, summative, or student self-assessment.

Background Scenario / How This Will Help You

This micro-credential collection provides earners the opportunity to document their knowledge and skills in teaching computer science to students in grades 6–12. The content provides resources to support understanding.

Earners are encouraged to participate in additional learning opportunities if more extensive learning is needed. Additional learning opportunities may include free online resources, postsecondary courses, and local courses.

The micro-credential structure offers earners flexible pathways and timelines. Earners can complete the micro-credentials in any order that aligns with their classroom timelines and availability. Micro-credentials offer earners the opportunity to submit evidence and receive evaluator feedback. Earners are encouraged to resubmit evidence until mastery is earned. Each resubmission will be reviewed and updated feedback will be provided.

Evidence Options
Candidates are required to submit multiple pieces of evidence.
Category: Analyze

Complete the ADDIE learning model by preparing evidence for each of the following tasks below: ANALYZE, DESIGN/DEVELOP, IMPLEMENT, and EVALUATE. Once completed upload evidence for review.

Analyze: Standards:

Please complete "02. ANALYZE – Impacts of Computing – Social Interactions" in the resources section below. All instructions are included in the worksheet. Once you have completed the worksheet, upload it in the evidence section. The resource can be found by following this link: https://bit.ly/35OEJSb.

Category: Design/Develop

Design or revise a lesson plan that incorporates the Wyoming standards for Impacts of Computing focus standard chosen during the Analyze task.

Lesson Plan:

Find "03. DESIGN/DEVELOP" in the resources section below. All instructions are included in the worksheet. Once you are finished with this task, upload your lesson plan in the evidence section. The resource can be found by following this link: https://bit.ly/2Urhzik.

Category: Implement

Implement the set of activities or lesson plan you designed and upload annotated student artifacts. You must submit all 2 pieces of evidence

Implementation:

Implement the set of activities or lesson plan you designed. Submit evidence of student learning for your focus standard. Include evidence of students that have met the standard and students that have not met the standard. Examples include videos of students working, completed student worksheets, etc. Annotate each piece of evidence to demonstrate how you facilitated student achievement of the standard.

Category: Evaluate

Create worksheet with eval questions

Journal:

Find "04 EVALUATE – Worksheet" in the resources below. All instructions are included in the worksheet. The resource can be found by following this link: https://bit.ly/3xMingf.


Review Criteria

Evidence submissions and reflections will be reviewed for alignment with the assignment guidelines and this proficiency scale, found here: https://bit.ly/35QcHGc. This checklist will help you review your submission materials to ensure you address everything that is expected for this micro-credential: https://bit.ly/3CIWqS6.

Reflection Prompts

Please provide a self-assessment, a score from 1–4, on each component of the proficiency scale found here: https://bit.ly/35QcHGc. Provide a few sentences stating where the pieces of evidence that support the scores for each component are located.

If you are resubmitting, please indicate what changes were made in the documents (e.g., highlight, text color) and include "Resubmission #" with the resubmission number in the file title when you upload.


Review Criteria

Proficiency scale: https://bit.ly/35QcHGc. Checklist: https://bit.ly/3CIWqS6.

Content Knowledge – CSTA 4a The teacher demonstrates accurate and complete knowledge of the content and skills of the standard being taught.

Inform instruction through assessment – CSTA 4g The teacher develops multiple forms and modalities of assessment to provide feedback and support. The teacher uses resulting data for instructional decision-making and differentiation.

Supporting standards The teacher identifies and explains the connection of supporting computer science standards to the standard being taught in their lesson.

Vertical alignment – CSTA 4b The teacher explains the relationship of the standard in the scope and sequence of computer science standards directly above and below chosen grade band.

Represent diverse perspectives – CSTA 2c The teacher meaningfully incorporates diverse perspectives and experiences of individuals from marginalized groups in curricular materials and instruction.

Commit to the mission of CS for all students – CSTA 3d The teacher develops a personal teaching philosophy reflecting that all students can and should learn computer science.

Resources
Research – Promoting Diversity-Inclusive Computer Science Pedagogies: A Multidimensional Perspective
https://www.cs.usfca.edu/vahab/resources/iticse2020paper.pdf

This paper demonstrates that to develop and assess pedagogical approaches aimed at promoting diversity, we must adopt a multidimensional perspective of student identities beyond only gender and race in the context of computer science.


Tool – Computer Science is for Everyone: A Toolkit for Middle and High Schools to Increase Diversity in Computer Science Education
https://www.ncwit.org/resources/computer-science-everyone-toolkit-middle-and-high-schools-increase-diversity-computer

The insights and tools in this kit will help ensure all young people understand the value of a computer science education and feel welcomed and empowered to succeed.


Lesson Plan – Be Internet Awesome
https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-interland.appspot.com/en-us/hub/pdfs/Google_BeInternetAwesome_DigitalCitizenshipSafety_2019Curriculum.pdf

The Be Internet Awesome curriculum is a collaboration between Google, The Net Safety Collaborative, and the Internet Keep Safe Coalition. The curriculum gives educators the tools and methods necessary to teach digital safety and citizenship fundamentals in the classroom. The lesson plans included are best suited for grades 2nd–6th, but educators with both older and younger students have found value in the curriculum, particularly with key vocabulary, class discussions (aged up or down), and gameplay.


Research – Digital Citizenship: Addressing Appropriate Technology Behavior
https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ695788

This article provides a definition of digital citizenship based on etiquette; communication; education; access; commerce; responsibility; rights; safety; and security; and discusses examples and strategies relating to each of these elements. The article concludes that digital citizenship has become a priority for schools that see technology integration as a major teaching and learning strategy for preparing students to live and work in the 21st century. Using the NETS to help understand how technology should be used in the curriculum and applying digital citizenship to help define students' behavior will facilitate the development of well-rounded, technology-savvy students.


Article – What Digital Literacy Looks Like in a Classroom
https://www.edweek.org/technology/opinion-what-digital-literacy-looks-like-in-a-classroom/2014/10

This resource discusses the necessity of digital literacy curriculum and what that looks like in the classroom.


Lesson Plan – Everything You Need to Teach Digital Citizenship
https://www.commonsense.org/education/digital-citizenship

Here are ready-to-teach free lessons to address K–12 digital citizenship.


Tool – Best Student-Collaboration Tools
https://www.commonsense.org/education/top-picks/best-student-collaboration-tools

These tools mix productivity and creativity, getting students to share and collaborate on projects, give and take feedback, annotate, brainstorm, make media, or just hang out. No matter the use, there's tech here that'll show students how collaboration leads to better knowledge building as well as the development of social and emotional skills like teamwork.


Article – Tips to Help Stop Cyberbullying
https://www.connectsafely.org/tips-to-help-stop-cyberbullying/

Guidance for parents and young people on cyberbullying, including advice for ending (or preventing) the cycle of aggression.


Article – Pair Programming
https://www.csforallteachers.org/blog/pair-programming

The general idea is that instead of having each student working on his or her own program, they work on it in pairs (or triads, if necessary). It runs along the line of: “two heads are better than one.”


Article – How Diversity Makes Us Smarter
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-diversity-makes-us-smarter/

This resource shares the reasons why diverse groups are more innovative than homogenous groups.


Video – How AI Works
https://code.org/educate/resources/videos

With an introduction by Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, this series of short videos will introduce you to how artificial intelligence works and why it matters. Learn about neural networks, or how AI learns, and delve into issues like algorithmic bias and the ethics of AI decision-making.


Video – Inspire Students to Try Computer Science
https://code.org/educate/resources/inspire

This resource shares six strategies for inspiring students to try computer science.


Article – 'Geek Gene' Denied: If you Find Computer Science Hard, it's your Fault (or your Teacher's)
https://www.theregister.com/2016/09/28/geek_gene_denied/

This resource debunks the myth that some people are naturally able to excel in computer science while others are not.


Research – Who Believes in Me? The Effect of Student-Teacher Demographic Match on Teacher Expectations
https://research.upjohn.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1248&context=up_workingpapers

This resource investigates whether student-teacher demographic mismatch affects high school teachers’ expectations for students’ educational attainment


Research – Evidence that Computer Science Grades are not Bimodal
https://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2020/1/241705-evidence-that-computer-science-grades-are-not-bimodal/fulltext#:~:text=Although%20it%20has%20never%20been,distributions%20passed%20tests%20of%20multimodality.

The results of this research study suggest that bimodal grades are instructional folklore in computer science, caused by confirmation bias and instructor beliefs about their students.


Research – Learning to Write Programs using Think-Pair-Share Programming Strategy: What are the Students’ Perceptions and Experiences?
https://jes.ejournal.unri.ac.id/index.php/JES/article/view/8034

The study argued that teachers should adopt the use of think-pair-share programming strategy for learning how to write programs notwithstanding the availability of computers due to its ability to aid knowledge retention.


Tool – UDL for Learning Guidelines + Computer Science/Computational Thinking
https://ctrl.education.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2020/05/Copy-of-UDL-and-CS_CT-remix.pdf

UDL is a framework for designing curriculum to be broadly accessible to ALL students. Learn more about utilizing the UDL framework in computer science education.


Standards – CSTA Standards for Computer Science Teachers
https://www.csteachers.org/page/standards-for-cs-teachers

These standards are designed to provide clear guidance on effective and equitable computer science instruction in support of rigorous computer science education for all K–12 students.


Article – Assessing Students' Computational Thinking Application in Core Subject Areas
https://csforall.medium.com/assessing-students-computational-thinking-application-in-core-subject-areas-b6799b117493

This article discusses how computational thinking skills were integrated and assessed in New York City elementary schools.


Article – Assessment Considerations: A Simple Heuristic
https://jaredoleary.com/publications/assessment-considerations-a-simple-heuristic

This article discusses different types of assessments and what to consider when choosing an assessment.


Article – Differentiation: How Do I Use Data to Adjust Instruction for Groups and Individual Students?
https://practices.learningaccelerator.org/problem-of-practice/data-differentiation-how-do-i-use-data-to-inform-instruction-for-groups-and-individual-students

Step-by-step guide showing teachers how they can change their lessons or classroom based on data.


01. PROFICIENCY SCALE – Impacts of Computing – Social Interaction
https://docs.google.com/document/d/17R6BmdfIB1A6zc4ms1u83B8QKMuAARyMzWOlYj7RN6I/copy

This scale is provided as a resource for learners to view micro-credential criterion and the performance descriptor levels for demonstration of mastery.


Micro-Credential Map By Grade Band
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1E6pQDbFCQ42O1FUzQIakJS9CRKraHiORCXdUXmdcBCw/copy#gid=1114401374

The computer science standards are written in grade bands (K–2, 3–5, 6–8, and 9–12). The standard committee (CSSRC) determined the standard to be met by the end of each grade band. In grades 9-12, there are level 1 and level 2 standards. Level 1 standards include introductory skills. Level 2 standards are intended for students who wish to advance their study of computer science. The teacher or earner can choose which grade band and standard to focus their lesson on.


02. ANALYZE – Impacts of Computing – Social Interactions
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1SklAVa6HxKsd_5kndwmoEUApWM3SWAoozN9tFDtE9jI/copy

Analyze the student and teacher standards aligned with the Impacts of Computing – Social Interactions micro-credential. Aligned standards and instructions for selecting a focus standard are outlined below the task description. There are two parts to this task.


03. DESIGN/DEVELOP
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Vboh_Hu3kK53uYJZCcQlDLCB6NTRwVPxvCyszP4zhUY/copy

Use this resource for the design/develop step of the ADDIE model.


04. EVALUATE – Worksheet
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1eevTS3Ay1X9nbtSvWvUjX7yj6DwaiZYEAAsyuNGlEb4/copy

Evaluate how effective your activities were at promoting student learning of the standards. Use specific examples from the artifacts you submitted in Implement and suggest any changes in practice or approach that you might make in the future based on your experience with this micro-credential.


Standards – Wyoming Computer Science Content and Performance Standards
https://edu.wyoming.gov/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/2020-CS-WYCPS-with-all-PLDs-effective-04.07.21.pdf

Performance Level Descriptors (PLDs) describe the performance expectations of students for each of the four (4) performance level categories: advanced, proficient, basic, and below basic. These are a description of what students within each performance level are expected to know and be able to do. All PLDs are found in this document.


Video – Teen Voices: Oversharing and Your Digital Footprint
https://youtu.be/ottnH427Fr8

In this video, teens discuss oversharing on social media and how posting effects your digital footprint. The full lesson plan is linked in the comments.


Video – Teen Voices: Who You're Talking to Online
https://youtu.be/DiI8Lj0_TGQ

In this video teens discuss how you really don't know who you are talking to if you are just talking to them online. It talks about the pros and cons of an online friend and how to be careful with what you share.


Article – "Unwrapping" the Standards: A Simple Way to Deconstruct Learning Outcomes
https://corwin-connect.com/2015/03/unwrapping-the-standards-a-simple-way-to-deconstruct-learning-outcomes/

“Unwrapping” is a simple method that all teachers in all grade levels can use to deconstruct the wording of any standard in order to know its meaning inside and out.


Sample Response – Completed Devices Micro-Credential
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ESoWRRdNZRjruO2j-1eq4CUU3YoWLlh1/view?usp=sharing

This resource includes a sample response for analyze, design/develop, implement, and analyze as well as a sample reflection prompt response for the devices micro-credential.


Social Interaction Micro-credential Checklist
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1l19FOelY6tlp02qm7GIaDtdzybi248K_1Jv8tKAKAMk/copy

This checklist will help you review your submission materials to ensure you address everything that is expected for this micro-credential.

Earners
Jennifer Anderson

Jennifer Anderson
Jill Felbeck-Jones

Jill Felbeck-Jones
Kiesa Geyer

Kiesa Geyer
Abby Hurley

Abby Hurley
Debbie Jacobson

Debbie Jacobson
Walt Smith

Walt Smith

Wyoming Department of Education

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